Previous achilles tendonosis (insertional)

Discussion in 'Ask the Docs' started by Dan Cook, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. Dan Cook

    Dan Cook Barefooters

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    I got achilles tendonosis running in very well cushioned shoes.

    To cut a long story short, it is ok as long as I keep away from speed work and stick to easy jogging (and gradually built up).

    A physiotherapist told me to switch to forefoot running (in trainers) but I couldn't manage it. I asked him for advice on how to run forefront, he said "just do it - you're overthinking ... running is natural". Since then changed physiotherapist.

    More recently started running barefoot, initially as an experiment to strengthen the feet, now I'm hooked.

    Here's my question: if you approach barefoot running carefully and develop proper technique, is barefoot running better for your achilles than shod running, over the longer term?
     
  2. Backfixer

    Backfixer Barefooters

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    Actually, it is more stressful on it at the beginning. As time goes on as you adapt, the strength and endurance in the tissues will improve but there is no one size fits all. If you had problems running shod, you may have different problems running barefoot, until the bad habits or mechanisms are resolved.

    I suggest you take a video of yourself on a treadmill for 30 seconds. It can be quite an education and perhaps help you understand why you hit so hard causing the achillies issue.

    A good sports chiropractor may be your best friend here.

    Hope that helps

    DR C.
     
  3. Dan Cook

    Dan Cook Barefooters

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    Thank you for your reply. Is it more stressful on the achilles short term but better long term? Or, let's play devil's advocate, should I got back to shod if I have a recent achilles history?

    Why a chiropractor rather than a physio or oesteopath? (Currently seeing someone qualified as a physio and osteo).
     
  4. Backfixer

    Backfixer Barefooters

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    A sports certified chiropractor is likely to take as more holistic approach and look at everything. You will miss the cause if you obsess with the area of pain. Also, going back to shod may help, but wearing an insert if needed may help more. If you read my book Cheating Mother Nature, available through Amazon, it will help you understand your body better.
     

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