whats next after 10k

Discussion in 'Training Information/Training Regimens' started by Paul NL, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. Paul NL

    Paul NL
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2017
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    33
    Hello runners

    1.5 year ago I started running coming from the cough basically. First week max 10 minutes and each week 2 minutes more. After a muscle injury I bought VFF KSO EVO and I am running on those since then. Just bought VFF V-Trail to get a bit more grip as the trails are getting slippery over here.

    6 months ago I could run 6 a 7 km in one hour. 3 months ago I started to train more, that is 4x a week with 2 intervals, a long run and a recovery run. Now I can run 10k in one hour as a easy run, meaning I was tired afterwards, but could have pushed a little more and ran it faster.

    My long term goal is to run ultras. But I am not in a hurry. If it takes a few years before I am there that is fine. Although If I could do it next year... but I need to be realistic I am not a young god anymore (51 years now) And the previous 7 years I did not do much sports. Before that I was more active, like hiking (not running) up and down Mount Whitney in one day (took us 14 hours).

    My question is how to best know what my next training step should be. My 12 week 10k training program just finished and I am thinking to train now for a half marathon distance, a 16 week program. Or I could go for a full marathon. Maybe, as the winter is coming, I should stick to a less aggressive plan. I know it is different for everyone but would like to hear your thoughts anyway.
     
    mandytheartist and Barefoot TJ like this.
  2. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    1. Nomad

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    20,261
    Likes Received:
    6,407
    A 15K or half marathon would probably be best to train for next. Say no to TMTS (too much too soon). Remember to bring socks if you need them.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    mandytheartist likes this.
  3. Tedlet

    Tedlet
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters
    1. United Kingdom

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Messages:
    848
    Likes Received:
    1,244
    Just thoughts....
    For me, once I'd done a couple of 10kms I definitely decided to aim for a half marathon as the next most logical step. I did though choose a race that was scheduled to be run a good few months away (at least six I think it was). That way I knew I'd be able to take the training steady and allow myself time to repair any potential injuries etc... along the way.
    It was enjoyable to have the distance as a target and also to know that I could train (increasing distance etc...) at a comfortable rate without imposing to much time pressure on myself. -Like TJ said: avoid too much too soon...
    Good luck...:barefoot:
     
    Barefoot TJ likes this.
  4. Paul NL

    Paul NL
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2017
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    33
    Tanks TJ and Tedlet, good advice.
    I have realized that my training program is mainly on heart-rate and time and not distance. So I will find out which distance will work with my body.
     
    mandytheartist and Barefoot TJ like this.
  5. mandytheartist

    mandytheartist
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters
    1. Massachusetts

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Messages:
    496
    Likes Received:
    247
    Coming in to agree that 1/2 marathon is the next logical distance to aspire to. And physiological goals are perfectly valid markers. (Not saying anyone said otherwise)
     
    Paul NL likes this.
  6. Jaap Francke

    Jaap Francke
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters
    1. Nederland -...

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    70
    I have same age and was making similar progress, my history:
    - July 2017: I started doing very short barefoot runs
    - Jan 2018: I did barefoot runs of 5km
    - April 2018: 9-12 km runs
    - Jul 2018: 9-16 km runs
    - Sep 2nd: I joined a 10 mile race. On skinners not barefooted to test my speed and I finished in 1:15:41, almost as fast as my PR from 5 years ago :)
    - Oct 2018: I decided to do a half marathon barefooted and at a relaxed pace. And I did, great experience!

    The bad news: since then, I have a little stress fracture in my left heel-bone. Or at least, that's what I think it is (self-diagnosis). Maybe I was a typical case of TMTS, but it didn't feel that way. Looking back and analysing some pictures, I came to the conclusion that at the end of my half-marathon i was loosing form (tiredness and/or enjoying the crowd) and was doing my 'old' heel-striking again.

    Now I'm still slowly recovering and getting into swimming to stay in shape.

    I leave the conclusion up to you.
    Recently I read somewhere: barefoot running doesn't prevent injuries, you just get different ones. There is truth in that, I'm afraid.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  7. Gordon

    Gordon
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2015
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    294
    Most ultras are run on trails, so you might could try a 10K trail race, choosing a real trail, not a flat gravel bike path through the park. Trails are usually a bit tougher at the same distance. Sometimes they're a lot tougher, since hills are generally seen as a good thing when it comes to trail races. Seems like most road races are flat, flat, flat, catering to folks chasing a fast time. Either way, increase the stress on your body gradually or you will get hurt. Be ready to back off the training if you start to notice issues. Since everyone responds differently to training, a cookbook plan might be too aggressive. Or not aggressive enough.
     
    mandytheartist likes this.
  8. Paul NL

    Paul NL
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2017
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    33
    @Jaap Francke Sorry to hear about your injury. Very unfortunate.

    @Gordon, good advice as well. I guess I need to drive a bit further to find some hills, as everything within 1 hour drive is real flat where I live.

    Yesterday I 'accidentally' run a 15k, the route we took was longer than we anticipated :( Except for muscle pain in the calves and being a bit tired, I am fine.
     

Share This Page