Running 'The Mile'

Discussion in 'Barefoot & Minimalist Running' started by paulbeales, Sep 12, 2014.

  1. paulbeales

    paulbeales Barefooters
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  2. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    That's interesting. I think by now you should be able to run a mile without stopping. How many times do you stop to walk for a 5K, race or just leisure?

    I finally broke my 30-minute 5K mark, but it took 3 or 4 years. I got to 28 something. If I can do it, anyone can...that's how pitiful of a runner I was.
     
  3. Kyrrinstoch

    Kyrrinstoch Barefooters
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    Paul, I think targeting a 1 mile distance is fine as a short-term goal. One of the ways to stay motivated about anything is to define one single large long term goal, then, break that down into a series of smaller, measurable and more readily attainable short term goals.

    For example - If your goal (like mine and TJ's) is to continuously run a full 5K distance without stopping in under 30:00 (regardless of terrain and/or weather), then break it down (as I did):
    1st goal - one mile
    2nd goal - one mile under 10:00
    3rd goal - 1.5 miles
    4th goal - 1.5 miles under 15:00
    and so on in 1/2 mile increments until...
    12th goal - 3.2 miles under 30:00

    I'm still working on making that 12th goal consistent. Some days my morning run comes in just under, while others I'm still noticeably over. It also depends on which trails/routes I take, how my IT Band is feeling and if I feel like a racing mindset or doing more sightseeing on any given run :p
     
  4. wanderingoutlaw

    wanderingoutlaw Barefooters
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    I like the mile distance. The only problem is there are so few 1-mile races. I know of only one in my hometown and it's part of a summer track series. A local running store (who also host the summer track series) tried to set up a series of three or four 1-mile races two or three years ago, but they only managed to have one. The rest were cancelled due to the city not giving permission for the streets to be closed. I ran in the one they did have; it was on the record setting hottest day ever recorded in my hometown. I think I ran a bit faster than usual cause the road was so hot.
     
  5. paulbeales

    paulbeales Barefooters
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    TJ - a kilometre is about my limit at the moment before I need to stop for breath. (That's around 2/3 mile.) It's getting the oxygen in that I struggle with. I am being a little bit impatient I think. I've just got back to where I was before I had the hernia op, but I still think I may have reached my limit at 33 minutes for a 5K. I've noticed if I try harder at the beginning, I suffer more at the end, and finish around the same time as taking it slower for further. That's why I'm thinking I should maybe just concentrate on the beginning only, i.e. push myself for one mile only (1.6km.) I also read somewhere else that short bursts of intense exercise are just as good for you as endurance workouts. Another thing I want to do is run with a sports therapist who might be able to tell me that I am mentally holding myself back, for fear of 'blowing a fuse' and maybe not pushing myself as hard as I maybe could?

    Kyrrinstoch - that's excellent advice, thanks. Like I said above, I've been trying to do a whole 5K faster throughout, but the more I push at the beginning the slower I get at the end, so like you say (and I was thinking) I should maybe concentrate on the first mile on it's own. I think I'll change the 3rd goal to one mile under 8 minutes though ;)

    Wanderingoutlaw - the article above reckons that Mile Races are going to get more popular. They do tend to get called 'Fun Runs' in the UK though, which is a bit off-putting, but at least means I'm unlikely to come last!

    Thanks for the advice guys! I think I know what I'm gonna do now tomorrow .... I will do a 1 mile warm up run, take a rest, then do a 1 mile timed run, take another rest, then run back to the car .... ;)
    .
     
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  6. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    I noticed you didn't "like" my post. :( I didn't mean anything negative by it. I was just trying to say don't give up. If my pitiful self can do it, not that you are pitiful too, anyone can do it. Yes, give it some time after your surgery too before you start to hit it hard. Running with a coach or sports therapist is a good idea. Maybe finding a local running club for support and running with someone who has a 10-minute or 9-minute mile would help.
     
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  7. skedaddle

    skedaddle Barefooters
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    Set realistic targets for your current fitness level or you'll just take the same frustrations from the 5k over to the mile.
    Instead of the 30min barrier it will be the 7min barrier.
    My advice, ditch the watch for a while, run at a pace where you are 'controlled and relaxed not forced and taxed!'
    Be good to yourself and celebrate every step you run. Sometimes when you take the pressure off you make the greatest gains.
     
  8. Ronnie B

    Ronnie B Barefooters

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    Gee - Skedaddle hit the nail on the head in his penultimate sentence. Dude just celebrate being able to get out there and run. I get out there and enjoy my runs with my dogs -all of us barefoot. Time - who gives a rat's a$$? Enjoy the experience! I don't bother to report my running miles 'cause it is incredibly small compared to what I see being posted. I just enjoy it and enjoy reading all the exploits of you all. The only milestone I hope for me for every run is to return alive with the dog! That doesn't mean I don't run hard or push the limit - it just means I'm not measuring the time it takes......
     
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  9. Tristan

    Tristan Barefooters
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    You've got good advise above Paul, can't add much there. On a more general note though, I do like the shorter faster races myself in some ways. But my opinion is changing. Last year I was doing speed workouts every week or two, plus pushing speed a little more in general. Striving to get my 5k time back in the range I used to run in HS. And for the first time in the few years I've been running as an adult, I did. Now my record HS 5k is still nearly 2 minutes faster but 19:28 atleast got me in the mix. Some dismiss 5k's as easy, but I tell you that was harder than probably any other race I did last year even including my first marathon. Granted it was over a lot sooner and recovery was quicker. But being so far out of breath, moving quick enough I could not even see obsticles on the trail (luckily they cleaned the trail surface prior to race). Tiny inclines I never even notice was there seemed to turn to huge hills that never ended lol. In contrast, the marathon I did a few weeks later was such an easier pace - in fact it was the first real 'race' I was not struggling with breath at all, and was practically comfortable (though that might be a tiny bit of a stretch). In fact when I hit 20 miles I was surprised how much energy it felt like I had, compared to the turn around point half way through the 5k where I thought OMG I'm going to die.

    And the 5k hurt too. Well I think it was the 5k but not sure... I felt a little sore after but no big deal, I kept on my usual training without any taper. The following weekend I was going to do my longest run yet, and 1/4 the way through I had unexplainable leg pains. It kept getting worse, and I had to bail for the first time ever mid-run and call for a pickup. I highly suspect the 5k race (and thinking afterwards that I didnt have to recover) was to blame.

    I think it feels good to go a bit on the fast side, and I think my form is better fast... to a point. But I think at my 5k race pace I'm going beyond what I can hold as good form and by the end of the race I'm slamming my feet pretty hard. So those shorter faster races have there own challenges. If I went a little slower it probably wouldnt be an issue, but I just seem to have the drive and energy to always push harder than I probably should.
     
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  10. paulbeales

    paulbeales Barefooters
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    Thanks for all the good advice guys. My back story is a little more complicated than the average recreational runner though. (It's posted on here somewhere if you want to know the gory details.) How I would dearly love to just run and run and just enjoy the experience but I'm not strong enough to do that yet. I need to set targets and push myself to make my body stronger and technique better. If I were to stick to a pace that was within my comfort zone, to be honest, I'd be walking :) Thanks again guys. Watch this space
     
  11. Hobbit

    Hobbit Barefooters
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    Hi Paul,
    if you have problems with a mile, do less, but every day!
    I think it's called stream running (one mile per day every day, regardless of speed). If this is yet too difficult, try a different approach: every day, do a 10 minute run (or five minutes, whatever you are able to do without problems). The following week you run a little bit longer every day (don't exceed 10%). Try to keep your heart rate down. (Yes, this is very slow running) and in a couple of weeks you'll be able to do 1 hour every day without walking and without getting hurt. And then you may look on the distance you're covering. Perhaps it's 5 K, perhaps 6, it doesn't matter, but once you're able to run for an hour, you decide if you want to speed up or rather cover more distance...
     
  12. paulbeales

    paulbeales Barefooters
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    OK then. Here's what I did this morning ... I went to a regular running route that I knew to be 5K and did an untimed walk/run warm-up for the first mile. It was good to be able to just run and not worry about pace and take the occasional longer walking break. At the end of the first mile I took a break and admired the view (something I've not done for a long time.) I then did a timed mile as fast as I could. I still had to take short walking breaks, but surprised myself with a PB of 09:54! I then did a further untimed mile back to the car. So, I got to push my limits AND do a controlled and relaxed run in the one outing, and do a 5K. Cool. And yes, Hobbit, that was part of the plan that if I concentrate on a mile, I will be able to do more regular runs, particularly now the days are getting shorter in the UK :) Thanks again guys
     
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  13. rickwhitelaw

    rickwhitelaw Barefooters
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    Sure, mix it up a little. Good advice from others.

    The problem I have and you might have with the mile is: there are no mile races around unless you can sneak into a kids fun run or a track event.:) So you would basically be just timing yourself.

    The other is you need a good warm up before running a mile hard and then a cool down. So by that point you have hit 5k anyway.

    I would go the opposite direction and build you longer distances first. Get up to consistently running/walking 10k and if everything feels good at that distance then try a 5k, you will be nicely surprised.
     
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  14. rickwhitelaw

    rickwhitelaw Barefooters
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    Don't let those high mileage guys and girls discourage you from posting your mileage. They all at one time or another started at 0. Some multiple times because of injuries and some are even wearing shoes.;) It's all about sharing our experiences and successes and hopefully not a boastful (even though it seems that way at times) forum.
     
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  15. Kyrrinstoch

    Kyrrinstoch Barefooters
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    Paul - however it works for you. I used those as general guidelines and still use them as milestones during my runs. By all means, modify as is appropriate for your goals and fitness levels. :cool:
     
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  16. Sid

    Sid Barefooters

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    These are all very thoughtful suggestions.

    Paul, what did your cardiologist say about your chronic heart failure and CRT pacemaker and how that affects your ability to exercise?
     
  17. paulbeales

    paulbeales Barefooters
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    My Doc actively encourages me to exercise. I discussed with him last year that I was struggling to run for long without having to walk for a while and he adjusted my settings to allow my HR to increase faster. I could tell the difference when I next ran. My pacemaker does not have any limiter on it. It does not stop my HR from reaching maximum. My medications do though. In terms of EF (pumping efficiency) my heart is working as it should. I will be discussing it all with him again next year.

    I'm really liking this change of plan to concentrate on the mile. I've found a route near home where I can run for 5K but I only time the middle mile. The mile section is a long straight downhill run where I can see the end from the start. (I know it's giving me exceptionally good times that I wouldn't get on the flat but it's a great spot for trying to run the full mile without walking. I had to have four short breaks last night.)

    So I'm still doing 5Ks but I am only pushing hard for one third of the distance, and enjoying some relaxed running for the rest.

    All thanks to you guys for clarifying my thoughts :)
    .
     
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  18. Ronnie B

    Ronnie B Barefooters

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    Thanks Rick - appreciate the advice. Will do. Cheers
     
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  19. Ronnie B

    Ronnie B Barefooters

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    Hi Paul - I can identify wholeheartedly (no pun intended!) with meds affecting your heart rate. I have been on a beta-blocker since September 1995 when I had a heart attack - 18 years ago next week - a classic LBJ one. I was really fit at the time and wondered where that came from - and the IC doctor advised - "Next time around spend more time choosing your parents!" This is why I run early mornings - when the medication is at its lowest level in the bloodstream. I take my beta blocker after my run. I have tried to run during other parts of the day - and just like you - I get tired really quickly and have to walk for a bit - then run again. Even on my early morning run - I have to run for a while - then walk then run again to get the heart rate up. Then I can run at a comfortable speed for a distance - or do sprints - as I have described in earlier threads. I have developed AF since then - but keep on truckin' with the same routine. I ran a marathon and a half marathon three weeks apart 8 months after my heart attack very much against doctor's advice. Now he keeps encouraging me to run! Wish you all the best.
     
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  20. paulbeales

    paulbeales Barefooters
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    Thanks Ronnie.

    Hmmm. I never thought about that, taking my Meds after running. Problem is I take them morning and night, so I'm probably pretty much 'doped' all the time. If I run evening time, that would be about the time when they are 'least effective', but I haven't noticed it being any easier to run at that time.

    Sorry to hear you have heart problems too, but good to hear that I'm not the only one trying to overcome them in their running ;)

    My Doc encourages me too. When I have a check-up, he's always telling the nurses how he has turned me into a marathon runner (despite me not having done one LOL)
    .
     

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