Run-walk-run: method or madness?

Discussion in 'Barefoot & Minimalist Running' started by Bare Lee, Aug 10, 2012.

  1. Barefoot Dama

    Barefoot Dama Barefooters
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    Scratch them
     

  2. Bare Lee

    Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    It's no fun alone. I need the road/trail to talk back to me.

    But thanks for the clarification. I thought you said you ran 14 miles and then began taking breaks, but what you're saying is that on your plus-14-mile runs, you begin taking one-minute walking breaks after each mile, right?
     
  3. Barefoot Dama

    Barefoot Dama Barefooters
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    You Sr are correct!
     

  4. EricsLearning

    EricsLearning Barefooters
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    I ran (sort of) a 50k last year and a guy using a 4 minute run 1 minute walk method beat me by about an hour. I don't know if that is because of the method, because I was undertrained or a combination. I do know it was rather humbling.
     
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  5. Bare Lee

    Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    Yah, I was reading that over longer distances, this method can actually be faster than straight running. Kind of counter-intuitive, but it makes sense. On a few of the runs in which I ended up walking, both in the middle of the run and at the end, when I checked my overall pace, it wasn't so bad. My running pace was around 10mm, but when you added in the walking, it wasn't that much over 11mm. With a more deliberate run-walk interval structure, and perhaps somewhat greater distances, I could see the straight running pace and the run-walk-run pace becoming the same, because the straight running pace would come down with fatigue, while the running pace in the run sections of the run-walk-run method could be maintained a bit higher for longer, as the walking breaks keep the legs fresh. Then maybe throw in a little backwards walking or running, and you're all set to run-walk-run-walk-run backwards-walk-run-walk backwards-run to a neighboring state.
     
  6. Sid

    Sid Barefooters

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    Higdon mentions walking in his marathon training recommendations and states that some pros have used this method.
    Marathon Training Guide - Intermediate 1

    I do wonder if anyone has used this method recently to win any of the big races. I'm also wondering if someone who has reached the pinnacle of conditioning would be able to make use of this method, or if it would just slow them down.
     
  7. Bare Lee

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  8. ChasingShadows

    ChasingShadows Barefooters
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    Makes sense to me - when forced to exercise in a way that felt unnatural (school PE lessons) I hated it with a passion & it dragged me down, now I get to do what I want it's fun & keeps me sane (well, relatively speaking).
     
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  9. rickwhitelaw

    rickwhitelaw Barefooters
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    Without going back through the entire thread, I have been doing a walk/run routine for injury recovery. It's slowly working and even when I'm back to 100% (well, I was really never there, but at least 90%), I'll do it for injury prevention. It's natural for me to do that trail running anyway. I walk occasionally for the technical sections or to view the scenery and run where I can. Few injuries trail running. Although it could be a form issue also. Trails might let me cheat a little.
     
  10. Bare Lee

    Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    Yah, Dama helped convince me of the method's merits, but I really become convinced when I applied it to my ITB problem at the end of last year. It, along with periodic stretching, allowed me to slowly build up distances again while keeping the ITBS ogre at bay. Now I'm wondering if I should always apply it for any attempt at running more than 5-6 miles, just to stay safe. On trails, like you say, I can see how the method would come more naturally, as there are more difficult sections and lots of nice scenery to be admired. When I was cycling it was natural to take breaks to appreciate the view and take pics. BTW, how did you get into farming? Are you from a farming background?
     
  11. dutchie53

    dutchie53 Barefooters
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    I agree with this method of taking walk breaks. Back many years ago I would have said that you did not run a marathon (or half) if you walked any portion of it. That mentality gave me a few of the misc. runners injuries over the years. Now that I am older (hopefully wiser) I have gotten to the point where I enjoy my walk breaks in long runs (10 miles or longer), and as a result less injuries, plus I am enjoying the long runs again. Again for me PR's are a dream goal at my age (those days are long gone), I run for the joy of running and my own personal well being.
     
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  12. Bare Lee

    Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    It really helps hearing your, a veteran runner's, endorsement--helps overcome the stigma/mentality you mentioned, that you didn't really do a run of x distance if you walked any portion of it. I think this will help me approach this year's newbie races with the same attitude I take on my regular runs. Just go to enjoy them and take whatever results follow in stride, so to speak. I know folks like Mr. Tree have this approach, and it seems like the appropriate one for an OCD cat like me too. I'm starting to feel better about this August's half Mary already. I've been worried that it would push me to try to improve too quickly.
     
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  13. happysongbird

    happysongbird Chapter Presidents
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    I have to let my hips relax in order to run.
     
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  14. Lomad

    Lomad Barefooters
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    I agree that the run walk interval approach is effective. I just really don't like walking. Therefore, I end up in 'forced walk' scenarios on long runs where I have to walk due to ineffective pacing. It's much harder to get back into a run from those walk intervals.

    'Course, if I did more hill work I'd need less walk breaks.
     
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  15. rickwhitelaw

    rickwhitelaw Barefooters
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    Long story, but to summarize.

    My Grandparents started farming in So. Utah after the war in 1946. Built a farm from raw desert sagebrush ground. Not even a tree. Raised my Dad and two Aunts.

    Big skip here - I spent as much time on the farm in the 70's with Grandpa and my Dad even though we lived in Northern Utah. Early 80's our family moved to So. Utah to a town 40 miles east of the farm. I went to school and worked on the farm.

    90's I finished college but couldn't stand being inside of buildings or in a city, so further education was out. This did not make my Grandfather or Dad happy. My Grandpa didn't want any of us to become farmers. Became a paid ski bum (ski patrol) in the winter and farmed in the spring, summer, and fall. Married and started a family. Both of my Grandparents died in the mid-90's and my Dad, Uncle, and I tried to run the farm as part time farmers. Late 90's we determined that the farm needed a full time caretaker, so I moved my family out and lived happily ever after.
     
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  16. Bare Lee

    Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    Thanks for sharing your story Rick. I have cousins who farm, so I have some familiarity with the lifestyle. Not sure if it would be for me, but if I could go back 20 years, I would definitely choose a career that had me outside more. Good decision on your part!
     
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  17. NickW

    NickW Guest

    This is what my Dad always tells me about labor jobs. I have tried going to school but I am not happy in this business program. I have one class next term to finish off this business degree and then I am transferring into an hvac program. I like working with my hands and I really miss it. To me, money doesn't mean much, especially if I'm unhappy. I think my Dad has always wanted better for me, but in reality I don't think he understands the value of happiness and hard work and working with your hands.
     
  18. rickwhitelaw

    rickwhitelaw Barefooters
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    Stick with it Nick. I think you will find happiness. Getting a business degree does not lock you to a desk job. I have a business degree with small business emphasis and that has worked out perfectly, for our farm is a "small business".
     
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  19. NickW

    NickW Guest

    Oh I'm finishing this business degree next term, but I would rather get into a field that I actually understand. I have to be the worst business student out there because I don't know anything. Its like Greek to me. I'll finish it but then go into another field in which I may find happiness, plus this business degree may help at some point in the future, whether giving me a leg up over someone else for a job or in some other way.
     
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