PF + Ankle Sprain and maybe a bone bruise?

Discussion in 'Ask the Docs' started by Jennn, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. Jennn

    Jennn Barefooters
    1. Colorado

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    I originally went to the doctor a couple months ago because I thought I might have a heel spur - I have a persistent feeling of walking on a sharp rock, in the back of my heel closer to my achilles than my arch. I had an MRI that showed healthy but inflamed soft tissue, and healthy bones. The verdict from the MRI was "well I guess it's just PF" and I was given a script for PT. LOVE the PT - and it's been helping a lot, but want to look here for minimalist running advice (I run more in VFFs than barefoot). Especially since I further injured the same foot:

    Last week I ran a 15k race and had a HUGE PR - I knocked a minute and a half off my usual race pace (I'm a slow runner and it's been over a year since my last race, so I expected a PR just not that big of one). The consequence was aggravating a very old ankle sprain from April, and a sore 5th metatarsal (my heel still feels the same though, which is better than it was before I started the PT). My PT is now treating the sprain and continuing to treat the PF and she suggested my metatarsal might be bruised from the run.

    I do not want to go through the expense and hassle of another MRI or any other imaging if I don't have to. Is there any advice I can follow to ensure that the bone bruise heals well (assuming it IS a bruise) and doesn't result in a fracture? I was in the middle of half marathon training for a race at the end of October. Should I forget the HM and significantly scale back my running for a while?

    (ETA: The old ankle sprain was not running related, I fell down some stairs.)

    Thanks!
     
  2. Backfixer

    Backfixer Barefooters

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    The problems you are having are related to impact, with the first discomfort by the achillies insertion and the second by the 5th metatarsal. The problem most people have is that everyone who is a healthcare practitioner looks at where it hurts, but there is no history of why.

    More often that not, I see a pattern of foot overpronation (where the foot turns out or falls in causing the knee to roll in and then the opposite leg tends to tighten in the tensor fascia, glut and along the lateral side of the leg. Most complaints such as these are due to gait, so I would not be surprised if your pelvis is torqued or distorted.

    Can you do a squat without falling over or losing your balance? I am guessing it is harder than it should be. A good sports chiropractor will look past the obvious and look at the hips, the muscles and the legs. Runners and others with foot problems should always have their gait examined, not just the point of pain. My book, Cheating Mother Nature, available through Amazon.com may offer some insight into what is going on since it talks about the mechanics of back and leg pain.

    Have you had any back issues. It can also offer some clues here. I hope this helps
     
  3. Jennn

    Jennn Barefooters
    1. Colorado

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    Thanks! I'll check out your book!

    I agree I must have some poor mechanics going on. I've had nothing but foot and ankle trouble since I started running. When I switched to barefoot a TON of problems disappeared, but obviously not all of them. :)

    I actually don't have any trouble doing a squat to the floor! I do have horribly wobbly ankles when I try to balance on one foot though - moreso on the injured one right now. A lot of my PT exercises are focused on ankle strength (one exercise I'm doing has the side benefit of hip strengthening too). I'm also doing more calf and hip stretches. My PT is also working on some crazy tightness in my calves with massage, EStim and dry needling.

    As far as back issues go I really don't have any. Hip issues on the other hand, I have occasional SI joint pain on one side (uninjured ankle side) and flexor pain in the other (injured ankle side).
     

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