Ok, so this winter running thing ...

Discussion in 'Chapters' started by Barefoot YOW, Nov 11, 2010.

  1. Barefoot YOW

    Barefoot YOW Barefooters
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    I'm still running barefoot. I, like most of you, am searching for a way to run barefoot in the great White North. I have read BF Rick's postings about running in the winter. I do admire his ability to run in the cold, but it appears that his limit is around -17C (0F), with most of his runs between 0C and -10C.

    I want to be one of the crazy nuts that runs in the cold. :) Imagine, as Rick said, the number of barefoot runner doing so in true winter conditions. I bet you could count on one hand those runners.

    I have been following the advice to acclimatize gradually, which is the advice I generally follow in training for the winter. I have been commuting to/from work on my bike. I wear sandals and only put on socks when it is below freezing. I'm walking (BF) outside in the evening.

    So does anyone have ideas as to how we Canadians can run in the cold?



    I'm going to go bare for as long as I can. It may mean that I cannot run barefoot every day. I was thinking of buying a pair of Barefoot Ted's Luna sandals and wear a wool tabi sock

    - YOW
     
  2. moominmamma

    moominmamma Barefooters
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    I'm new to this too, but so far (down to about 0ºC)I think the real enemy isn't the cold so much as the wet. Dry asphalt / pavement is quite comfortable for my feet dow to the freezing point provided I warm up first. But damp trails or puddles are a different matter entirely.

    Miranda
     
  3. Kittyk

    Kittyk Barefooters
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    I have actually run on cold asphalt barefoot and it actually wasn't so bad. It is the wet and uneven that I think is the problem.

    I love running trails and I live in Vancouver (the worlds most northerly rainforest) - you can see I have a little issue at the moment ;)
     
  4. inbetweenmytoes

    inbetweenmytoes Barefooters
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    I took on the challenge to wear nothing but Vibram FiveFingers (or nothing at all... below the ankle that is) for a year starting last February. Because FiveFingers are absolutely not water proof, I found myself running four blocks unshod to work in the snow on many occasions. My bare feet are my most waterproof footwear :) I would then put dry Vibrams on while at work. Admittedly, the -15 degree days were numbing to say the least. I feel my feet are better adapted to barefooted-ness now, and with incrementally colder weather runs, a bit of a cold build up, I may do better with barefoot snow running this winter.
     
  5. inbetweenmytoes

    inbetweenmytoes Barefooters
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    Just the four blocks to work so not very far at all, but in minus 15, four blocks feels more like a lifetime :). I've been doing around 3 miles at a time at around 0 degrees, but that is largely on dry pavement. Can't wait to try it in the snow again.
     
  6. inbetweenmytoes

    inbetweenmytoes Barefooters
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    Sorry for the confusion, Alan. I grew up in and currently live in a small farming community just off the 49th parallel. Distance and lengths are usually referred to imperially, often disregarding the posted metric road signs. It doesn't help that I have a lot of experience in the trades which still can't shake the imperial system, and I spent over 10 years in the States. Temperature, however, I still refer to in Celsius. I'll work on that distance thing, especially for this forum. Hope you can still accept me :)
     

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