Getting started with flat feet and Post Tib Issues

Discussion in 'Ask the Docs' started by csprink1, Jul 14, 2011.

  1. csprink1

    csprink1 Barefooters

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    Hi Docs,

    I am new to this forum and the main reason I joined was to gain as much info as I can about barefoot running. I had just started getting into long distance shod running when I had a partial tear in my post tib on my right foot from playing basketball. I have always had flexible flat feet but now my podiatrist thinks its time to get the orthotics and said that "you're just not gonna be a barefoot guy." As in, I shouldn't even walk barefoot.

    Now this is all terrible news because prior to the injury I had just finished Born to Run and started a little barefoot running and was loving it.

    My question is, is it even reasonable for me to attempt to start running barefoot once my tendon heals up? I'm afriad if I go down the orthotics route I will just end up getting worse and have to get surgery. But then I am nervous to start after what my podiotrist said.

    Any advice or opinions would be greatly appreciated. I want to join the barefoot world but just want to make sure that it's a smart move.



    Thanks.
     
  2. dunetraveller

    dunetraveller Barefooters
    1. Nevada -...

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    Is your flat feet condition

    Is your flat feet condition because the bones are fused and unable to form an arch? I ask because we are born with flat feet and have to walk and exercise the muscles to form the arch. This takes some years to accomplish as I have read. If it's not a congenital problem making it impossible, then with proper exercises, and good walking form, it ought to be as possible for you to form your arch now as it would be for a child just starting to learn how to walk. Beyond that, I have seen pics of runners here with some fairly flat feet.

    John T.
     

  3. csprink1

    csprink1 Barefooters

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    My feet have arches (albiet

    My feet have arches (albiet small) when they aren't bearing any weight but it's when I put weight on them that they become very flat. The podiatrist did mention that flat footed people do have a different bone structure, its not that I lost an arch I just haven't really ever had one.
     
  4. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    The doctor will be with you

    The doctor will be with you shortly. (I love saying that, like I'm the receptionist or something.) I've emailed them this link.
     
  5. Dr. Andrew Klein

    Dr. Andrew Klein Barefooters
    1. Minnesota

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    Just some thoughts from the

    Just some thoughts from the cheap seats since I dont know the mechanism of your injury or the severity or location of the tear.

    Did you have pain when you were BF running before, and were you working into the program slowly to build strength in your feet/legs? Secondly, do you have pain now at the site of the injury or is pain pervasive through the entire foot? I ask because if you were having good results before and not screaming with pain, I don't see a reason why you couldn't start over AFTER your injury is healed. It may just be that you need to do more strengthening and progress more slowly than you might wish.

    If the tendon injury is healed, gradually increasing natural forces on it (gravity and body weight) will allow for gentle remodeling of the scar tissue (never completely replacing it, just like a scar on your skin that fades but persists) that is formed during healing to help the tendon regain normal strength and function.

    I am of the opinion that trying to start BF again after the injury is healed is a prudent and acceptable thing to do. Start slow, and let your body be your teacher. If you go out and run six miles barefoot you will likely have problems and may cause extreme damage. If you start slow with jumping drills and walking and are able to work slowly into running longer distances without pain, then perfect. If no matter how slow you go you continue to have pain and can never achieve good form, then disappointing but you tried!
     
  6. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    That response ladies and

    That response ladies and gents is from a chiropractor, not of the Ask the Docs group, but a DC no doubt. Thanks for your input, NT!
     
  7. Dr. Andrew Klein

    Dr. Andrew Klein Barefooters
    1. Minnesota

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    Don't want to step on any

    Don't want to step on any toes, I was just still awake so I answered.[​IMG]
     
  8. Dr. Mark

    Dr. Mark Barefooters
    1. West Virginia

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    Dr. Klein is right on,

    Dr. Klein is right on, appreciate the cautious approach and progressive drills....jump roping is a beautiful drill to wake up the elastic recoil of the tendons and fascia, critical for running. We posted a piece by Jay Dicharry which we use in our store and for self assessment of ability to progress to barefoot. This is an important piece for learning midstance stability.

    http://naturalrunningcenter.com/2011/07/09/ask-the-experts-how-much-time-do-i-need-to-transition-to-minimalist-footwear/



    Achieving Achilles and calf mobility also important…you should be able to progress to a basic squat.



    Look at the post on my daughter’s jumprope while running drill to on the Natural running Center homepage. Do this and you will figure out the form.



    http://naturalrunningcenter.com/2011/07/08/running-while-jumping-rope-prevents-overstriding/



    Dr. Mark
     
  9. Dr. Mark

    Dr. Mark Barefooters
    1. West Virginia

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    Trying to link a picture of a

    Trying to link a picture of a basic squat
     
  10. The posterior tibial

    The posterior tibial muscle/tendon is the main muscle that holds up the arch of our feet. But, your foot actually has approx 30 muscles in it or entering it from the the leg. So if you strengthen all these muscles, use good form, even if you PT muscle is on the weak side, you should eventually be able to run.

    The key is go gradually, and you need the committment to strengthen the muscles.
     
  11. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    Dr. Mark, I looked at the

    Dr. Mark, I looked at the link you were providing, and it takes me to a page where there are no photos, or at least, there's a blank, white page.
     
  12. Dr James Stoxen DC

    Dr James Stoxen DC Barefooters
    1. Illinois

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    Its not whether your feet are flat or high arched its about the spring suspension system and the muscles that support it. The spring suspension system springs you off the ground providing protection from impacts of walking and running.

    Also the spring suspension system recycles energy by springing you off of the ground rather than banging you into the ground. These muscles have long tendons, which are elastic providing free elastic energy that will allow movements to be more efficient.

    The key is that if the spring mechanism weakens it can stiffen or lock which turns into a lever also known as foot lock mechanism, which is less efficient and cannot protect you as well from impacts.

    Less efficiency equals chronic fatigue, inability to protect you from chronic impacts, which causes pain.

    Read these articles by DR. James Stoxen; about the spring suspension system with self-help hands on treatments and exercises to help with the spring system mechanism.

    Foot Lock! What You Get From Standing Too Long And How To Prevent It

    http://teamdoctorsblog.com/2012/03/31/video-tutorial-159-foot-lock-what-you-get-from-standing-all-day-how-it-negatively-affects-your-health-and-how-to-prevent-it/

    Foot Eversion

    http://teamdoctorsblog.com/2012/04/...ning-exercises-of-the-human-foot-in-eversion/

    Dr James Stoxen DC, President, Team Doctors The Barefoot Running Doctor
     

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