Concurrent Strength Training & Running 2015: Eight-Week Workout Cycle V

Discussion in 'Training Information/Training Regimens' started by Bare Lee, Aug 14, 2015.

  1. Bare Lee

    Bare Lee
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    Well, I'm not completely convinced that DLs bother my knee. It's a working hypothesis. Today I'll try conventional DLs again and see how it goes. My right knee feels better every day, so if it feels worse after today's workout, that would be good confirming evidence that conventional DLs do indeed bother my knees.

    In your case, I wonder if it's a technical tweak that's needed, or you just need a little more time to adapt to consistent squatting. Almost everything I've read, including squatting after knee replacement surgery, suggests that squats, properly done, are good, not bad, for the knees. So I dunno.

    I think you're maybe overthinking things a little bit in your potential programming. I think you should only manipulate one or two variables max, otherwise, it's hard to know what's really going on, what's getting results and what's not. Plus, I don't think a lot of variety (in parameters or exercise selection) is necessarily effective. I like your idea of switching between, say a week or four weeks of progressive overload, and then a week or four weeks of volume. That's interesting.

    Microloading until you can't finish, and then taking a step back also seems like a good idea. I think there is something to the idea of deloading once in a while. I don't know why it would work, but it seems to. Maybe it helps build volume/density/work capacity? I'm beginning to sense that my workout three times a week might be a little too much, so I might have to think through some of the possibilities you've suggested, but for the moment, I'm still placing my faith in simple microloading and, if it starts to feel too hard, simply sitting at a load until it starts to feel easier and then resume the microloading. That's the beauty of microloading--it never should get to the point when it feels like it's too hard. Just slow the rate of increase if it starts to feel too hard. And too easy is always better than too hard, because the loading will eventually catch up to your strength level.

    I think Rippetoe is right that for most of us, simple and hard are enough. I also think Wendler is right that we should (1) start light, (2) progress slowly, (3) set PRs, and (4) focus on the basic, compound lifts. I've been progressing really slowly this cycle, and there have been times when I've been tempted to add weight to a given lift, but I'm getting better at judging the workouts as a whole. And bringing up all the lifts slowly, at about the same relative level of intensity, seems to be the way to go for me. I think all the lifts have carryover, so it's foolish to get too caught up in the results of any one lift. I still think squats are the keystone, but they can only come up in the context of everything else getting stronger too. And vice versa.

    So, I think if I were you, I would stick with the full-body split you got now, and start to microload when everything starts to feel relatively easy. Or maybe even back off right now to make everything easy and start microloading right away. For microloading, try something that seems too little at first, like a pound or two a week. Just a pound a week adds up to 52 pounds in a year after all. Give that a try for at least four weeks, but better eight, before you start to tweak anything. I feel like I'm really starting to hit a sweet spot now after about two months of consistency. Really feeling strong and confident in my lifts these days, and I love the mindless flow of the workouts.

    But as Rippetoe says, it's hard to believe that simple can work. How can 3 x 5 x 6 lifts be enough? But I think it is. I always feel a little guilty for not doing dips or back extensions, and so on, though. Or for not varying my rep scheme. And microloading is kind of similar. It seems too simple. Today I'm adding one pound to my squat. How can one pound make a difference? But then Friday I'm adding another pound, and by the end of the year, my projected 1RM will be over 300 pounds. Sometime next year, it should be 350.
     
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  2. Abide

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    Yeah thanks for the reminder about not tweaking too much at once. I think right now things are pretty easy at the weight I am working. I break a decent sweat in the 20 sets but I always have plenty more to go. So once this cycle is over I will simply start semi-micro-loading the lifts for the next 4 weeks and just add 2.5kgs per week per lift. Then I can reassess and see if I should hold the weight for a couple of weeks or maybe modify the reps.

    Although now that I think about it 2.5kgs per week is a pretty decent jump. What do you think about upping it every other week, then just running that for the full 8 weeks to see. so all lifts will increase 10kgs in 8 weeks. Or possibly upping the lower stuff weekly as I have a lot more potential there from where I am working.

    Yeah I agree sometimes I also get the urge to add some variety but lately it seems to just add confusion. I suspect consistency is much more important. I have also been thinking about the balance of concurrent training and how most programs might be too much work while training for other things. It's one of the reasons why I jumped at your suggestion of 3 lifts, its pretty easy to increase and decrease volume depending on what else is going on. With 6 lifts you are a little more limited, adding another set or two really increases the time commitment and dropping a set cuts into the efficacy.

    I'm curious to see how the micro-loading approach works. If I respond well I'll probably pick up some small weight plates like you have to keep the process going.

    Deloading probably works but it seems like one week of after 6 weeks is probably a better schedule. Based on what I have read. Then again there is also the issue with interference between lifting and aerobic activity. So if you delaod you should probably take a rest week from the other stuff too. Maybe a 7 week work / 1 week deload would work pretty well?

    Yeah I was hoping that would be the case for squatting too, if its still bothering me I'll tweak with my depth a little. I play with my setup each time to see what feels the best but it seems to be the motion that irritates it. I started slowing my descent and eliminating any bouncing at the bottom. Hopefully that'll work.
     
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    In the evening I rode another two and a half miles or so with my kids down at the park. Sure enough, my daughter proved to me that she could ride without training wheels, and she rode well. I guess it took her younger brother showing her up for her to motivate. So having to switch from running to cycling has brought the unexpected windfall of allowing my to recreate more with my kids. It probably would've been several more years before we could run together, but we can cycle together right now.

    Very cool, I still take advantage of this too. And if you start running again you should be able to keep up while they are on the bikes.
     
  4. Bare Lee

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    Have you tried stretching/Yoga too? Might also be good to stop once in a while during your runs and stretch a bit, like the hamstring stretch, and the ITB stretch. I've done this on my last couple of bike rides and it really helps keep things from tightening up during and afterwards. Might work for you too.

    How is your shoulder by the way? Has it healed up completely? Your press loads are low I know by design, but it seems like you able to do them just fine now.

    Yah, I think the full-body, three lifts per workout scheme (Squat/Deadlift + 2 Upper Body) can work very well. That's what I was doing last summer, I think. After I reach a certain point, I will probably switch to something like that too. The heavier the loads, the harder it is to keep up with six lifts. It takes more warm-up sets, and each set wears you out more. Or, alternatively, I could just do two sets of everything if the workouts start to get too hard as the loads increase.

    At the moment though, the six lifts are flowing better and better. Once in a while I have a crappy workout, but for the most part, I think I've found a good intensity level for all of the lifts and I'm able to go through 3 x 5 x 6 lifts in about an hour or less, and I don't feel beat-up afterwards.

    The alternative to microloading with plates is to do it with reps, right? Something like add two reps to each set before you add 5-10 pounds and bring the rep count back down to five.
    5 x 5 x Ly
    5 x 6 x Ly
    5 x 7 x Ly
    5 x 5 x Ly+5-10
    (L = Load)

    But I like using plates better. They're overpriced at 40-50 dolars, and you could make something with chains or washers, but I like the convenience and I don't like messing around with rep counts too much. It's one more thing to think about, and I like my workouts to be as mindless as possible.

    I've been experimenting a bit squat tempo too. Slower is harder but maybe easier on the joints. I like faster sometimes because I can get through a set before I start to feel accumulating fatigue. With slower, I need more mental effort on the fourth or fifth rep.

    For Deloading, yeah, I agree. If I were to try it, it would probably be within the structure of our eight-week cycles, and I think seven weeks on, one week off would be about right. In fact, I might try that either this cycle or next.
    I don't know, they're pretty speedy, and I'm pretty slow. Last night they both begged me to go out for a ride, even though it was getting dark already. So the habit is taking hold. We saw a lightening strike as soon as we headed up the street, however, so we turned right back. But yeah, nothing better than hanging out with the kids in the evening. It's pure parental bliss. Especially when we're doing something I enjoy as well.
     
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    Its still slowly getting better but does still give me some issues benching. Pressing seems to be ok the low weights mainly a loss in strength. That's another reason I am taking it slow to get a base built before I start overloading it.
    Yeah the stretch that seems to work the best is the pigeon pose. The rolling did help with the calf though. I'll start making that a routine again. I do stop and stretch while running but it doesn't seem to do much, or it immediately starts hurting again when I start running. It funny how many issues pop up that are caused by compensation of another issue. The good thing is its pretty minor pain and it goes away quickly. It's much less worrisome than the itbs was.

    Yeah that's what I was thinking about doing in a week or two if things are too easy. I think that might work well with the upper stuff to help with building some hypertrophy and base strength in the shoulder. Thanks again for the ideas.

    The deload doesn't have to be an overall drop in weights either it can just be a light week and then you jump back into where you were at before. That's what Wendler recommends at least. It's probably best once you start hitting your ceiling at that point in time, or at least skippable when things are still easy.

    We try to do the same with them as well and take a walk while they ride their bikes or scooters. Seems to get them asleep more soundly too. I actually started taking the older two mountain biking with me the last couple of weeks. It's been a fun adventure, with a few big wipeouts. I was told next time I need to carry a first aid kit with me ha. It's pretty amazing how much stamina and endurance those little legs have.
     
  6. Bare Lee

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    Yah, lowering the bench weight and then moving to more of a medium/close grip has helped my left thumb heal up. It's almost normal now. I guess with your shoulder you're doing the same thing, taking the load down to where you no longer feel a strain, and then build up from that base when you're able. A good rehab strategy, better than complete rest I think, if the injury is mild or has healed up to a certain point.

    Yah, I find rolling with 'the stick' is most effective for the lower leg, and stretching for the upper. I don't do much foam rolling for anything but I probably should. I was thinking doing somersaults would be good for keeping the whole kinetic chain limber too.

    I tend to load the lower body lifts at twice the rate I load the upper body lifts. Mostly because my bench is/was way better than my other main lifts, and my deadlift is or used to be way better than my squat, so I take the two weakest lifts, the squat and press, and, using the Iron Ratio, which puts the squat at a 2:1 ratio to the press, I add two pounds to the squat each week and one pound to the press, and then peg the deadlift load and bench load to the squat and press loads, respectively. Right now my ratios are 2:3:3.5:4 for Press:Bench:Squat: deadlift. If I can keep at this long enough, hopefully, someday the ratios will be more like the ideal 2:3:4:5. Should be possible, because I feel like I have more potential to exploit in my Squat and Deadlift, if my knees can handle it.

    The rep increase can work, and we see it in some programs, right? But the secret to microloading is that you barely notice it, so if you were to try microloading, you really should get the plates to see how it really works, and see if it's right for you. Using higher reps or bigger jumps over longer periods of time, like your proposed 2.5 kgs over two weeks, isn't an exact substitute. Try to find at least half-kilo plates, I would think, if you want to give microloading a try. For it to work, each workout must feel more or less exactly like the last one. This way you approach the bar with full confidence that you can bang out the sets and reps, because, you pretty much did that 2-3 days ago. And so the workouts become really mindless, no need to psych yourself up very much before each set. Really, only the last rep of each set should require real mental effort, the first ones should feel easy. Of course, if you're having one of those monster workouts that happen once in a while, you can easily add in more intensity, with more reps or sets. Sometimes I wonder if I'll ever do singles again. Five reps is risk-free and easy.

    Yah, that's probably the way I would deload if I were to do it. Just schedule in an easy week and then pick up where I left off. It would be hard to let go of the gains, although the idea of starting off again at 5-10 pounds lower is intriguing.

    Always good to share ideas, thanks. Really helps keep me motivated too.

    Yah, I've noticed that too, the kids sleep better with after-dinner recreation. It's good for our digestion too I think.
     
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  8. Bare Lee

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    Right on!

    Yah, there's lots of ways of doing it, but fractional plates are probably the easiest, especially when you're doing half-pound increases like I am (quarter-pound plates on each side).

    I don't know where I first got the idea. Google search? Reading a forum? It was last winter sometime I think. In any case, it's just a logical refinement of the progressive overload concept, so I think it just made a lot of sense to me when I stumbled upon it. Here's a good explanation of how it works: http://stronglifts.com/microloading-small-fractional-plates-iron-woody/
    Interesting that he notes why fractional plates cost so much--it's because they're made with tighter weight tolerances. I would imagine a lower volume of sales has something to do with it too.

    I don't notice the difference, workout to workout, and I think if you do, then that means you should wait a bit longer before upping the next increment, or use smaller increments. Where you might notice it most is on the last rep of a set. The last rep should be hard but not a struggle. A few weeks ago I struggled on the last rep or two on some of my sets/lifts, but right now, I think I have a pretty good rate of increase set for my current strength levels (less than 1% per week), so the increases feel pretty seamless, and I repeat the same loads on Monday as I did on the prior Friday. Of course, once I start to notice the workouts or a particular lift getting harder, I will slow the rate of increase. Conversely, if the sets start to feel too easy, I'll speed up the rate of increase.

    Of course, the flip side of mindless is boredom. A mindless routine like mine could become pretty boring, but it hasn't so far. It's feeling more and more Zen-like. Like doing the same damn fundamentals (kihon) at the beginning of each karate practice. Keeping it simple takes you deeper sometimes, constantly honing the technique, breathing and mindset.

    Now if I could learn how to shift my bike gears a little more seamlessly.
     
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  9. BroadArrow

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    today was supposed to be my rest day and all. but then the bigger kids decided to go for a bike ride and the little kids decided to stay home. which meant that we could go a little faster. we ended up with four and a quarter miles to the park and around and back. at least i did a slow pace.

    i'm trying to have a relatively structured plan for the next 4 weeks until race day (along with this last week) since i think that last sunday's long run was one run too many and tipped me into the dreaded "overtraining" zone. i'm trying to get back to the weights (especially the squats) to bullet-proof the legs and knees. back to basics...
     
  10. Bare Lee

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    One more remark on the microloading/fractional plates: If you're loading less than 1% per workout (if you add a pound to a 3 x 5 x 200-lbs Squat, that's just 0.5%), then that is probably well within the intensity variation you may already feel due to extrinsic factors, like how well you slept, motivation, concentration, or fueling. Some days the bar feels a little heavier, or a little lighter, even if the load is the same, right? So with microloading, you're just making the bar a little heavier, the same as it might feel if you're simply a little tired, but insignificant in terms of being able to complete each set. If you get the dosage right, then your body can recover and adapt completely in the intervening 48-72 hours before the next workout. So the strength gains become rather seamless.

    OK, having said that, I'm thinking of making a bit of a push on the squats. I'm going to start going up by three pounds per week again instead of two, which may be a little bit beyond my ability to adapt and keep pace. We'll see. If I can do it, my 5RM will be up by 40 pounds by the end of the year, and my 1RM up by 50. The goal is to reach the Iron Ratios (2:3:4:5) sooner rather than later, by the end of the year, so the microloading concept will be a bit abused in the meantime, and my Press and Bench will be increasing slower than necessary and probably will begin to feel too easy.

    2015 Load Projections 15.09.21.jpg

    2015 Load Projections 2--5.09.21.jpg

    But once I achieve the Iron Ratio, and my Squat is twice as heavy as my Press, then I will resume weekly increases that once again feel pretty seamless and comfortable for all lifts. Eventually, sometime next year, my Squat and Press will finally catch up to my Bench and I'll be able to do a 200-pound Press, a 300-pound Bench, and a 400-pound Squat. Then I'll retire and focus on badminton.
     
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    You know there is even a difference in perceived heaviness between the sets that easily exceeds 1-2 lbs. Microloading from the beginning like you are doing is just a slow moving linear plan. The big question I have is if these small 1% increases per week, or what would be around a 3-5% increase in a month will help build a solid base at that weight versus making bigger jumps and cycling back. I'm curious to see what happens between your squats and deadlifts right now if you make bigger jumps on the squat. Like how many weeks till you plateau and what the increase was as well.

    Badmitton's a little exciting for my blood, I might just take up walking if I ever hit a 300lb. squat.
     
  12. Bare Lee

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    Yah, the idea of cycling back is intriguing, but I sometimes wonder if it really makes sense from a physiological point of view. I've only tried it when my training is interrupted for one reason or another, but I don't think I've ever noticed feeling stronger once I start training again. It's usually pretty easy to build back to where I was, but I don't think deloading or cycling back to a lower weight has ever helped me progress past that point. But then again, I've never really plateaued. I used to think 225 was a natural plateau for my bench press, but then I discovered once I paid more attention to the other main lifts, I could easily exceed that load.

    Like we've said, microloading is just progressive overload with finer gradations. Nothing new. For me, the big advantage is mental. If I make a five- or ten-pound jump, the load will feel heavier, and it will require more mental effort to prepare for a set. With microloading, I can approach the bar knowing that I can already complete the set, because I've already more or less completed the same set a few days prior, within a small 0-1% differential. So I'm more confident and the workout becomes pretty mindless. I don't have to psych myself up for anything, and the loads feel hard but very doable. I'm daydreaming most of the time. After the warm-up sets, I just look at my Excel chart to see what the load should be, think a little bit about which combo of plates will add up to that load, but then am free to allow my mind to drift once again. Of course, once I'm lifting I'm concentrating on good form and paying attention to whatever feedback there may be, but the experience itself is pretty numberless and calm, like a good aerobic workout. Kind of the opposite of a powerlifting meet. It's counterintuitive, but by obsessing about small numbers and percentages outside of workouts, I'm able to make the actual workout less obsessive, more seamless.

    As for plateauing, I wonder if one ever really ever plateaus? Maybe the rate of increase just slows to the imperceptible, until, of course, age starts subtracting. I guess I've never trained long enough, or consistently enough, to ever plateau, so I don't really know. But yeah, there's a good chance I will "plateau" before I reach my yearend goals, in which case I'd go back to two pounds a week, or even one pound a week if that's too much. Still, my squat has always seemed to go up pretty well whenever I've tried to increase it, so I suspect there's some untapped, readily available potential there. The most sensible thing would be to simply continue with the rate I have now, two pounds per week, since that is going well, but I'm letting the arbitrary goal of attaining the Iron Ratio by the end of year dictate my training (at least for this week!), for no real reason, just to have a training goal I guess, a little challenge to make me feel a little less old and rickety. It's fun to feel like you can still improve at least one aspect of fitness after youth has faded.

    In any case, I wonder if the concept of "plateau" really has any place in microloading. It seems to be all about controlling the rate of increase, getting the dosage right. Even if I hit a 400-pound squat and it takes me many weeks or months to hit 401, or even 400.5, it's still progressing, right?

    I agree about badminton. I was just kidding. For retirement I'll will probably switch to lion taming.

    The paused reps are interesting, easier on the joints, harder on the muscles. I like them also as a form-check.

    You always did like your loaded carries. I've been tempted to try them once in a while too, but I don't think my knees would like them.

    I am getting more of a Jones to try some form of running though. I'm learning how to manage this thing I think, just as Dutchie said I could. I'm almost think some sprints might be easier on the knees than a longer, slow run. But that can't be correct, can it?
     
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    Ahh yeah good point about the form check its really does function like that. The rebound on the bench is when I feel the most pain in my shoulder, which kind of makes sense as that is when the connecting tissues hold the most tension and mashes it all up. I'm thinking about doing paused squats to help my knees as well.

    I've plateaued a couple of times when I was doing 531 back in the day, but dropping weight wasn't that effective. Plus it's mentally frustrating when you rewind your sessions back 6 weeks every so often. I think there are natural strength plateaus for everyone, especially if you focus on maintaining weight, or doing other crazy crap like BA running ultras and 100 mile weeks. I guess it depends how long of a time range you look at it though. You're right though a pound every 8 weeks should be possible you think, or hope. Who knows, I'd probably quit and start doing something else in hopes of faster gains.

    I'm not sure about sprints, but aren't hill sprints supposed to be the magic elixir to all ails in life? And isn't running bad due to the eccentrics anyway? I'm a little down on running right now oddly enough. I'm a little bitter at my hip giving me crap still.
     
  14. Bare Lee

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    Yah, once I approach 80-90 percent of my genetic potential (minus cumulative effects of aging) I doubt I'll feel an urge to fight for the last 10-20%. What I like most about my current approach is how easy, simple, and mindless everything feels. It was you, right, who first introduced me to the idea of "easy strength"? At first I didn't buy it, but I'm sold now. Basically, I'm following Wendler's four principles--(1) start easy, (2) progress slowly, (3) do the compound lifts, (4) set PRs--although I arrived at them circuitously.

    Once I start having to incorporate more advanced training techniques and programming to make progress, I will probably just sit on my gains for as long as possible and then begin the long, slow journey towards complete atrophy, culminating in postmortem decomposition. I know I can achieve a 300-pound squat, but probably not a 400-pound squat, so it'll be interesting to see where I end up in between. And I train without spotters, so there will always be a limit on how far I can push things. I sprained my thumb a few months ago trying to recover my bench press single too soon. I don't want to do that sort of stupid stuff again. Nonetheless, once I get my squat over 300, to 320-330 pounds, it will be tempting to try and see if I got a 400-pound deadlift in me, even if it means aggravating my meniscus a bit for a week or two afterwards. So don't slack off too much on your deadlifts. The contest is still on.

    Yeah, hills might be a viable option. They sure worked while I was rehabbing my stubbed toe. A lot less impact, even if the grade is just 7-10%. We'll see. Could be a once a week thing, which would take a little pressure off the cycling to remain interesting. My one-hour route options are pretty limited if I want to stick to bike paths near where I live, so they'll get a little boring in a while.

    I don't know about the eccentrics, for my issue, it's simply one of impact I think. The function of the meniscus cartilage is to absorb shock, that's why running or jumping are the hardest on it. So if I run again, it makes sense to do it with the least amount of impact.

    By the way, I should have a set of front and rear turn signals on my bike by the end of the week, along with a car horn. I'm also going to try mounting some speakers on the handlebar. Unlike with running, I don't feel safe cycling with earbuds, but I miss the music sometimes.

    I think cycling back to build a solid base only works if you're adding something at the lower weight, like greater volume (more sets or reps) or density (shorter rest intervals) or intensity (faster bar speed). Otherwise, I don't see how you would adapt differently than the first time around at that weight.
     
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  15. Sid

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    Ordered some 1.25lb plates to overcome some psychological plateaus.
    Thanks
     
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  16. Bare Lee

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    Cool, how's the training going these days with the new set-up, btw?

    I'm starting to think more seriously about your approach to aerobic stuff. Maybe mixing it up between different modalities (biking, swimming, running[?]) is the way to go? Hey, wait a minute, am I training for a triathlon without realizing it?
     
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  17. Sid

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    The new setup is awesome. Pricey, but worth it. Still getting used to lifting though.

    Right now, for cardio, I just run. It's most convenient for me to go out the door and do 5 miles, rather than drive to the pool.
    I think that having variety is good, and I might do that again at some point.
     
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    Sounds good, I haven't been slacking too much. Next week I'll probably add 10kgs to my DL to get to 130kgs and then start either a 2.5kg increase per week after and shoot for 150kgs by the end of the next cycle. I'll rethink my strategy for 400 after that. I may drop in single rep jumps in the middle of the 20 rep sets or something like that.

    Yeah once I hit that magic point 80% which I think is a 405lb deadlift and a 315 squat, I'll probably just switch to a little easier higher volume plan geared more for looks. And maybe just once a year work a heavy cycle or two.

    Yeah, hills might be a viable option. They sure worked while I was rehabbing my stubbed toe. A lot less impact, even if the grade is just 7-10%. We'll see. Could be a once a week thing, which would take a little pressure off the cycling to remain interesting. My one-hour route options are pretty limited if I want to stick to bike paths near where I live, so they'll get a little boring in a while.

    Yeah sorry that's what I meant about the eccentric, that constant pounding motion you get running flats. Any hills you can run up mid-ride, I'd work them in in small doses 3-4 sprints a first and slowly build it up. You'll be warmed up too.

    Trail running might also be a viable running option for you, not so much the ground is softer but the variation of terrain might help build up some stability and strength in your knees. I think I might quit the paved run commutes if my hip keeps shitting on me. It always seems like the stupid nagging injuries start on the road. And road running just plain blows compared to trail running.

    Yeah that always been a confusing thing about wendler's plan for me. Once you fail a lift he say you should drop weight but there weren't any clear specifics about what to do next time. I should reread his books to see if I just missed it.
     
  19. Bare Lee

    Bare Lee
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    Last week the Oly DL felt heavy at just 259 x 5. I'll see how it goes later today at 267. Today will kind of decide whether I can do them regularly or not. My right knee feels really good today so if it feels worse after the workout, I'll pretty much know it's the Oly DLs. If I can't do them regularly, I may just test singles once a cycle or so, to see if it's keeping up with its projection based on the Squat and SLDL loads.

    Trail running is an intriguing idea thanks. The repetitive stress would be lessened, as you say, but I still don't know if I can do any kind of distance. In any case, there aren't any convenient trails nearby. The closest is about a 25-minute drive one-way. I think sprints down on the gravelly sand track or hill 'sprints' on the big hill near my house would be my best options for a regularly scheduled running day.

    Doing a little running mid-ride is also an excellent idea, thanks. That might be the best way to go, because I don't think I can/should run for a full, one-hour workout. There are plenty of hills and even some short trails down by the river where I ride most of the time. Just have to secure the bike or keep it in view. I've got so much crap on the handlebars now, and will be adding even more in a day or two, that it's not something I can leave out of sight any more. Not to mention the 130-dollar saddle.

    Anyway, that's a great idea, thanks!

    Lemme know if you find anything on Wendler's deload. Intellectually, it doesn't make sense to me, but there is something intuitively right about it. More and more, however, I'm coming to the conclusion that most health/nutrition/fitness theory over-complicates stuff way too much, especially for non-elite, recreational fitness types like us. Yesterday T-Nation had an article about Leptin for god's sake. Really? Now we have to worry about Leptin? I still try to get in a protein shake after my workouts, but other than that, I refuse to think about nutrition much. And for ST, it seems like the big lifts + progressive overload is really all you need. All those complicated strategies, do they really make a difference for intermediate lifters? Doesn't the body get stronger on its own with simple, regular stressors? I guess I always go back to my traveling days when I didn't know anything about cycling or nutrition but was able to do passes in the Pyrenees after just two months, or ride through Africa fueled by pretty simple foods. Or look at you, running ultras with minimal training.
     
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  20. Abide

    Abide
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    I keep picturing you riding this this.

    [​IMG]

    I was hoping to hear about your 267 deadlifts today!
     
    dutchie53 and Bare Lee like this.

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