Calluses (on the fifth met base)

Discussion in 'Health, Nutrition, Injuries & Medical Conditions' started by metalbarefooter, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. metalbarefooter

    metalbarefooter
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters
    1. Sweden

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2011
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    20
    I have been wondering about this for some years and not been able to figure it out...

    I think I understand the science behind calluses to a certain degree, that a callous is caused by some sort of friction to protect the tissues underneath, I'm i right?

    I have a callus on both 5th metatarsal heads as shown in the pictures, more pronounced on the right foot and I hardly notice it all on the left foot. Most of the times I run without problems but from time to time, like yesterday I stepped on a small debrise on the pavement right in the middle of this callus and it hurts like hell. Goes away after a few hours though.

    I have this theory that the twisting of the 5th toes (due to years of illfitting shoes) are making me load this area in a wrong way and since it's the first area on landing it gets a lot of pressure.
    The 5th toe is also elevated in a relaxed, unloaded state as shown in the third picture. Fourth is with bodyweight on the foot.

    Anyone have any experiences like these and would a product like Correct Toes help this although it can't be worn running barefoot? I want callous-free feet:)
    05.jpg 06.jpg 07.jpg 08.jpg
     
  2. Sid

    Sid
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    2,800
    Likes Received:
    3,432
    I used to have something similar. I run on concrete. I would land on the area of the 5th met first, then the rest of the forefoot. Now, I just land on the entire forefoot. It took about a year to change.
    I found engaging the big toes to be helpful. http://www.thebarefootrunners.org/threads/engaging-the-big-toes.17853/

    I also worked at filing down the callus. It's still pretty tough, but doesn't bother me anymore. Good luck!
     
  3. paraganek

    paraganek
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters
    1. Oregon

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    818
    Likes Received:
    1,012
    Agree with Sid. It also seems to me from the pictures you have a very pronounced arch (high instep) which is not helpful when running barefoot (load distribution) and may be the reason you are getting calluses.
    Good luck with the transition.
     
    Sid likes this.
  4. metalbarefooter

    metalbarefooter
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters
    1. Sweden

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2011
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    20
    OK, thank you guys. Did it disappear after some time Sid for you? I haven't tried filing it down but will give it a go. Today I tried to spread the weight a bit more to a flatfooted type of landing and it helps but i feel i loose a bit of spring.

    Adam, you are right, pretty high arches. I would have preferred a bit beefier foot but what do you do:)

    /Mikael
     
  5. Sid

    Sid
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    2,800
    Likes Received:
    3,432
    Engaging the big toes helped me with spring.
     
  6. Einar

    Einar
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2015
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    98
    Looks like you has metatarsus adductus, but only on 1st and 2nd metatarsal. Rest looks straight. Maybe this is reason for more pressure distributed to 5th metatarsal.
     
  7. Sid

    Sid
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    2,800
    Likes Received:
    3,432
  8. metalbarefooter

    metalbarefooter
    Expand Collapse
    Barefooters
    1. Sweden

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2011
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    20
    I honestly don't know but I doubt it though. I haven't had any problems growing up. A mild case of it perhaps but I think it's more related to all the years of the usual narrow shoes and playing Ice hockey from age 7 years up to 21 years of age when the feet were still growing. Ice skates are horrible for the feet now that I think of it but it wasn't anything i thought of at the time until discovering the barefoot movement in the late 20's. (31 years now)
     
    Sid likes this.

Share This Page