Barefoot Amendment

Discussion in 'Barefootedness' started by Tyler J L, Nov 30, 2016.

  1. Tyler J L

    Tyler J L Barefooters
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    Who here thinks Congress and the government should sign a law permitting people to go barefoot wherever they choose? Since all groups for the most part have their rights, why can't the barefoot community have their rights too!?
     
  2. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    Yes, with no liability on anyone's part (and I know that's going to open a can, but...)
     
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  3. hikerdana

    hikerdana Barefooters
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    No law needs to be made, since we already have that right. Stores will always be able to disallow bare feet because it is their property and they have that right. I would never want a law made that takes way someone else's right and puts mine ahead of theirs.

    The problem we barefooters face, is not a legality issue but a social one. Bare feet are just not socially acceptable by many people. A law will not change that either.

    Just my help opening that can TJ starting opening.
     
  4. Tyler J L

    Tyler J L Barefooters
    1. Iowa

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    I see. Also "Just my help opening that can TJ starting opening"? What's that supposed to mean?
     
  5. Tyler J L

    Tyler J L Barefooters
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    Also I was saying it as a way to have it be not discriminatory on our end. You know?
     
  6. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    We actually don't have that right to go barefoot anywhere we want...in public (public library, public school, etc.) or privately owned businesses (stores, amusement parks, etc.). It's not a right. Store owners, for example, can send you packing if they want, and if you don't comply (get out or get shod), they can have the police remove you. No law protects us from this. That would be like saying we have the right to parade around naked. If we did, you and I know we'd be arrested for indecent exposure in probably most public places.

    What Tyler is getting to, I believe, is that he would like to see that we have the right to go barefoot anywhere without being challenged by the status quo.

    That's why I said as long as there would be no liability on anyone's part, I think there should be a law stating specifically so. I stub my toe in your building, I don't sue you. (I know I will hear it on this one, but I stand by this.)

    Also, if being allowed to venture everywhere publicly were allowed, then more people would do it, and more people would be "desensitized" to it, allow it, and eventually accept it. That's the case with nearly everything in history that's not evil if you think about it.
     
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  7. Tyler J L

    Tyler J L Barefooters
    1. Iowa

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    Yeah TJ that's exactly what I'm trying to get at. I want it so we barefooters can go barefoot without being challenged by status quo and have people not freak about it. So if the government can hear us say something about that and make the status quo get off our backs, that'd be nice.

    That's all I'm saying.
     
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  8. Tristan

    Tristan Barefooters
    1. Ohio

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    I share you're desire there, but I think Dana is pretty much got it, generally we can go most places barefoot that is public and there are not specific laws against it except for certain places. This could be changed to include all public places, I'd be all for that. But private property is private property even if they let anyone on it (like Wallmart, gas stations, McDonalds, etc) and they can make whatever rules for their own property, like requirement for shirts, banning guns, no smoking at the pump, etc. They also have the right to throw you off their property, like if you were being violent or offensive a security guard might escort you out of Wallmart. Now I'd love to be able to go shopping barefoot with no shirt and packing a 9mm but I also respect the rights private owners have to make their own rules. That being said for most of these places you don't need laws to give you the right to be barefoot since there is no law against it, you just need to convince the property owners to allow it, and with the big mega corporations out there with all their lawyers and liability insurance dictating what they can allow is going to be a hard thing to change.

    The thing is whether it is allowed or not won't immediately change societies acceptance of it, or the status quo as you say. People will have their opinions and might never change, regardless of laws. I think some people may come around given education on the matter, but it will take a lot before that happens. Most people have pretty messed up feet, deformed toes and smelly, fungus, and what have you. And they probably assume that is the norm... so they are rather shocked at the thought of going barefoot in public. It seems to me the average person just doesn't understand that wearing shoes has caused most or all of their foot problems. And they don't understand that going barefoot could actually be more healthy. So while there are very few actual laws out there against barefooting, the bigger issue I think is just societies ignorance of the health benefits and strong opinions against it. But maybe little by little this will be changing as more information is spread.
     
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  9. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    A note about liability, thinking on the issue... Of course stores, etc., should keep their facilities clean of hazards. They are required to do it regardless if we wear gloves to protect our hands in their stores or helmets to protect our heads. When I talk about liability, I'm talking about the mistakes we make that cause us injury, stubbing a toe on a fixed object, pinching a finger pushing shopping carts together. We have to also take responsibility for our own actions and not always blame someone else.
     
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  10. Tyler J L

    Tyler J L Barefooters
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    Agreed TJ. As the 2015 adult citizen of character I know better than to blame everyone for something that goes wrong (with a few exceptions but that's beyond my point). Who knows? Maybe someday it will happen with the changing times.
     
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  11. Tristan

    Tristan Barefooters
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    Very much agreed there, if a property owner is negligent that is different (they left hazards exposed, etc) but if I am not paying attention and run a shopping cart into a glass door and then cut myself, then that is my liability and I don't know why it is allowed in the U.S. to sue over such things. People need to be responsible for themselves and not be allowed to sue other people over their own dumb selves faults. I here lots of stories where folks wander on to someone else property (often times to rob them) and then hurt themselves doing something they shouldn't be doing, and sue the landowner. That just drives me nuts that it is even legal.
     
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  12. Ahcuah

    Ahcuah Barefooters

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    Sigh. So much ignorance in this thread (sorry!).

    First, a national law would violate state sovereignty. Nothing, absent a constitutional amendment, gives the national government power to regulate in this area.

    Second, while it is true that people owning private property can do as they wish (mostly), public accommodations are subject to different standards. The best (and most parallel) example I can think of is breastfeeding laws. For instance, the Ohio version reads:

    A mother is entitled to breast-feed her baby in any location of a place of public accommodation wherein the mother otherwise is permitted.​

    But third, does anybody think we have a snowball's chance in hell of affecting such a change? We can't even get a decent letter-writing campaign against any one store. (And it's a million times worse thinking about a national constitutional amendment.)
     
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  13. Tyler J L

    Tyler J L Barefooters
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    I like to think of it as a wild stab in the dark. Besides, eventually people in government will include a majority of millenials. Some of which may be barefooters so suffice to say, it may happen. Just don't know when.
     
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  14. Tyler J L

    Tyler J L Barefooters
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    Plus, TJ knows what she's talking about. She's the head honcho of this group!
     
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  15. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    Hee. You crack me up, always saying it like it is. :barefoot:

    That's like saying, "It'll stop hurting when the pain goes away."

    No snowball, I'm afraid. But I know that you have had some success with writing letters, hint, hint.

    Do you know of any "laws" (not policies) anywhere that allow or disallow barefootedness in public?
     
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  16. Barefoot TJ

    Barefoot TJ Administrator
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    Thank you for your vote, Tyler. Actually, Ahcuah is well-rehearsed in the "rights" and laws about barefootedness in public, since he has challenged the status quo time and again for many years. At times, I have deferred to him for his valuable, real-world insight. Check out his very informative blog at http://ahcuah.com.
     
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  17. Tyler J L

    Tyler J L Barefooters
    1. Iowa

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    You're welcome TJ. I don't know of any "laws" that prohibit barefootedness or allow it but maybe someday there will be. Especially when it comes to millennials such as myself
     
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  18. hikerdana

    hikerdana Barefooters
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    Once again, I feel that laws usually only take things away from us. Rarely does a law grant us extra privileges, though driving is a good example of a law that gives us something. But then there are all kind so laws telling us how not to drive. You will be hard pressed to find any laws that actually give us anything. I can be wrong here, but that is how I see laws working. Our Bill of Rights is a huge exception that states we are allowed or have certain rights that can not be taken away, but that is technically not a law.

    So my point is, once we proclaim that we need a law to be allowed to be barefoot, that implies that we cannot go barefoot now, because the law doesn't allow it. I strongly disagree. I believe I have the right to go barefoot now in public, on the sidewalks and in other public places. Now there are places that do not allow barefooters, so we should work on abolishing those laws, instead of getting a law made that gives us a right, that I feel we already have. Cause once they make a law that allows something, they can more easily take that right away or add conditions to the law, much like they do with driving.

    What we really need is a big public advertising campaign that helps change how people view a barefoot person. A law doesn't change people and they would still hassle us and kick us out of their stores. Just read some of the posts from people who have medical conditions that require them to be barefoot. They have a legal right to be barefoot, but are still given a huge hassle. Read Ahcuah blog at http://ahcuah.com to see the problems he has had.

    Though Tyler J L I do love the idea of going everywhere barefoot and being welcomed every where I go. I would even love the idea that my mom embraced 100% my barefootedness. But no law will change how my mom feels about me being barefoot all the time. Though she does embrace it more than I thought she would, she still feels I need to wear shoes more than I feel I do. And do you really think a law will change what a mother feels is proper. I don't think so. She'll just say the law is wrong and still want me to wear shoes to church, which I do, cause it makes her happy and shoes for a few hours is worth her being happy. I also wear shoes to church cause getting along is what we need to do, life isn't all about me.
     
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  19. Ahcuah

    Ahcuah Barefooters

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    There are cities (or towns) that have local ordinances (which are laws with possible arrest for violating them) banning bare feet in public establishments. A list is here.

    And then there is Burien, WA.

    Burien, WA Bans Bare Feet
     
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  20. hikerdana

    hikerdana Barefooters
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    Wow, good article on Burien, WA. Other observation:
    Franklin MA, if they don't have a sign, your allowed to be barefoot.
    Yarmouth, MA at least the regulation has to be posted, so we have warning.
    Ocean City requires "other protective devices adequate to prevent injuries to the general public" - would that include my thick built up soles designed to protect my feet? and is preventing injuries to the general public, myself or others?

    Buncombe County, NC seems to actually the best - it requires people to not dispose of stuff that can damage barefeet at the dump. Sounds like you can go barefoot there.

    Thanks for the good resources Ahcuah
     
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