Most complete explanation of training protocols I've seen yet

Discussion in 'Barefoot & Minimalist Running' started by Bare Lee, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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  2. Sid Barefooters

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  3. Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    Cool. What I like about McMillan is that his calculator is easier to understand than Daniels, and can be applied to any performance goal, from 5k to ultramarathon, and can be used for targeting paces for different kinds of training runs. He also explains each run or training type very clearly in few words. It's like Lydiard condensed to 5-6 web pages. I wish I would've stumbled upon this last spring when I first began looking into this stuff.

    Maybe others can post some of their favorite training sites here.

    BTW, are you training for a marathon?

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  4. Barefoot Gentile Barefooters

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    I discovered this McMillan some years ago, defintiley some nice information. I think the pace chart is very handy.

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  5. Hobbit Barefooters
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    Thanks for sharing! :)
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  6. dutchie53 Barefooters
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    His pace prediction is right on the money when I entered my time for a 10k, then checked the predicted 1/2m time, it was right on the time I ran the 1/2 in. Impressive.
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  7. Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    Yah, also for training runs, very impressive. I plugged in my time for one mile, and then all of the suggested training paces for different kinds of runs (tempo, long and easy, cruise intervals, speed intervals) were right around the paces I've been running them. He's got the formula right. Together with his explanations, it's kind of a one-stop shopping site for running geeks. He's also convinced me that I'm a 10k to 1/2 mary kind of runner, which was my sense of things, so if I ever enter a race, it'll be one of those.

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  8. NickW Guest

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    I've seen that calculator before, it's pretty good stuff. I will finish reading that article later today.
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  9. Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    Yah, I came across it a few months ago, but didn't investigate the rest of the site until yesterday. After plugging in your values, be sure to scroll down past the race paces to see the suggested paces on the training runs too.

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  10. NickW Guest

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    Ya I had just looked at that. Whew, I need to ditch the stroller if I am going to train at the paces that are suggested for me... Right now, I'm getting closer to those paces, but not there yet. I think entering in a race time, for me which is stroller-less, and then training while pushing the stroller messes up the calculator. I need to figure out a good baseline with the stroller and enter it in so I can plan from there. My races will always be much faster than what I can train at as long as I have to run with the stroller. That's what makes races so fun and exciting though for me. I get to see what I can really do WITHOUT the stroller. It's like a mystery guessing game until I cross that line.
  11. Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    Yah, we also need to keep in mind that McMillian is probably thinking in terms of ideal, flat track conditions. I took my mile pace down at the nearby track as my base pace, but all of my longer runs are on roads and sidewalks/asphalt paths, with variability in surface and topography. Still, comparing his projected paces and my recently recorded paces for different runs, the calculator is never very far off, always within range. I'm going to use it to set my pace alerts on my next few runs and see how I do. Also note that on the section describing the how and whys of longer, endurance runs, there's no mention of HR, just projected paces. This jibes with what I've read on other serious running sites. They always talk in terms of different paces. Pace appears to be the keystone concept of running.

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  12. NickW Guest

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    This is always what I'd been taught, pace instead of hr. It's only been the last year and a half two years that I'd ever heard of hr running (Maf or other). I'd done that for cycling a bit, but I used to do endurance events while cycling.
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  13. Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    Yah, even for cycling, back when I used to cycle 100 miles a day, I could always feel what a sustainable pace was, and geared up accordingly.

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  14. Sid Barefooters

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    Oh, no, no! No marathon here. Perhaps sometime in the future, at some point. Working on strength and conditioning right now.

    I just thought it was great that someone summarized each of the different training philosophies on one page.
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  15. chuckcwall Barefooters
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    Lee, what device do you use to set/measure pace alerts? Would you recommend it? Thanks!

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  16. Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    I use the Garmin Forerunner 210. I got it in June and I've been happy with it, although it takes a few minutes for it to lock onto satellites. I don't know anything about other GPS gadgets, so I don't know how it compares, but I've been pretty happy with it so far. It's easy to use and the menus are pretty intuitively set up. I know Timex has come out with one that is cheaper, but I don't know what sort of features it has. If it has the same basic features it might be a better value, as I don't use any of the more sophisticated features of my Garmin.

    P.S., is that you underwater in your avatar?

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  17. Barefooting Bob Chapter Presidents
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    All right, I am going to use this. If I can complete a 4hour 40 min 50km I am going to s**t. Further to that I will do backflips if I can get a 22hour 18 min 100 miler in this year.

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  18. Sid Barefooters

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    I'm guessing that all of this applies to dedicated runners who adhere to a consistent training regimen and diet.

    Although this article is targeting marathon runners, I'm finding that energy status is the most important factor for me, probably because I'm placing the highest priority on maintaining weight and not running performance.
    Metabolic Factors Limiting Performance in Marathon Runners

    I like the concept of pace, but that's going to depend on how much gas that I have in the tank. There's nearly a 2 minute/mile difference between the same run on Sat and today, the major difference being carb status. Did I get a workout on both days? Sure! Am I making progress? Yes! I don't like wearing an HR strap, so that's out for me, too. I'm thinking that there's lots of different philosophies. A person just has to find one that fits.

    My Nike GPS watch takes a few minutes, too. So, I put it on first when getting ready for a run and hit the sync button. By the time I get ready to go out the door, it's locked on. It doesn't do pace alarms. My old Garmin GPS for the car took a few minutes, too. My phone takes about a minute. I think that all of them just take some time.
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  19. Hobbit Barefooters
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    Recently Garmin brought a new basic GPS Forerunner model on the market: the FR 10
    It costs (and weights) much less than the 210 but has similar features (though it doesn't measure heart rate). I don't own the 210 but the 110 which lacks pace alerts. The 10 has them. The 10 is also quicker to find Satellite than the 110 (and 210 as it seems ) and (this is a real plus) the pace is shown in realtime and not some seconds later as was the problem with all previous forerunner models (even the really expensive ones).

    BUT there is a problem with the FR 10 (there always is, isn't it?): Apparently it was conceived as a beginner's watch (it has everything a beginner needs and nothing else); the problem is, the rechargeable batterie inside needs to be recharged after only 4 hours or so (compared to 8 hours for the FR 110). So it can't be used on really long runs. Which means as well: it needs to be charged more often which will tire out the batterie much quicker. The batterie cannot be changed once it is dead - you need to buy another watch when it happens. But this is the same for all other Garmin GPS watches. :mad:
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  20. Bare Lee Chapter Presidents
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    I'm guessing that all of this applies to dedicated runners who adhere to a consistent training regimen and diet.

    I personally can't be bothered thinking too much about diet. I've lost 40 pounds over a year and several months purely through exercise. My diet is basically 80% paleo, but I never count calories and don't sweat sins like dairy and beer (wheat). But I am pretty robotic about eating more or less the same thing everyday, except for dinner, so I don't really have any energy fluctuations outside of how well or much I've slept. So my training is pretty consistent. I usually like to have at least one meal in me before a run, and at least two before strength-training.


    If I ever were to race, half-marathons are appealing partly for this reason; I wouldn't have to think about food or water. (The other reason is that, unlike a full marathon, I could actually train the distance I was going to race.)

    Metabolic Factors Limiting Performance in Marathon Runners

    I'm thinking that there's lots of different philosophies. A person just has to find one that fits.

    Completely agree. I would add: find one that fits and is enjoyable. Right now I'm getting into paces, and different sorts of training protocols. But I wouldn't be surprised if I go back to a 'just run' mentality sometime soon. I'm only doing this for as long as it's fun. Whether that's for a few months, few years, or for the rest of my running days, I can't say.

    I think that all of them just take some time.

    Good to know. I often stick mine outside while I'm doing a little pre-run rolling and stretching. Lomad suggested that it helps if you delete your run history periodically. I think this may be true.

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